Author Message

katashi65

Rank 3
katashi65
Joined
21 May 2011
Posts
1251
Location
United States
PostedOct 13, 2012 9:55 pm

Pokemon Individual Values and Effort Values

Warning: Wall of text - Only meant for Pokemon fans
~ Preamble: Why Bother? ~

Many people think Individual Values and Effort Values are boring. Many people think they are too complicated. That stressing over them detracts from the overall enjoyment of a Pokémon adventure.

But they make a huge difference for battling, and they aren't quite as tedious to take advantage of as some might believe. Since Individual Values and Effort Values both impact Pokémon so greatly, this guide is dedicated to showing that these two factors are not that difficult to understand. And this is really quite important for competitive battlers since the stat efficiency could secure quite a few victories in battle! It has even become somewhat of a standard to give EV distributions when describing you roster for approval from other trainers, and many of you reading this have probably seen threads offering to breed for superior IV's. Many people have mastered these mechanics to great effect, but for those of you who seek to learn, my heart goes out to you! Also, in hopes of making this thread less boring, I will punctuate sections with some very well drawn Pokémon pictures by Kaitou_Kouji.

My goal is to help people understand. By no means am I suggesting that stressing over Individual Values and Effort Values is the only way to play, or the "right" one, but I do want to say that they are very useful to trainers who aim to fully tap a Pokémon's potential. I am always open to the suggestions for improving this thread, and I heartily accept advice and corrections. To show how important Individual Values and Effort Values could be to a trainer, I urge you to watch the following animation of a perfectly bred and EV trained Caterpie and a wild, untrained Steelix.




~ Getting Started - Individual Values ~

IV's are Individual Values, and Pokémon are born with them. They range from 0-31 (0 being the worst and 31 being the best). An IV directly affects the stat it is assigned to and each and every stat is assigned an IV; this keeps every Pokémon's individual abilities varied to a degree.

Let's say I have two level 50 Luxray, and all factors other than IV's are kept constant. One has 145 Attack and the other has only 139 Attack. They are the same Pokémon; why does the stat differ? Because one was born with inherently higher Attack and the IV factor is how the trait is numerically expressed for each stat in the game. It does not matter how you acquire the Pokémon; IV’s are basically numbers (0 - 31) randomly assigned to each of a Pokémon's stats when it appears in a wild battle or the moment an egg is conferred upon you by the Daycare man. At that point, there is no way to alter IV's in the same way one cannot change a Pokémon’s Nature upon acquiring the Pokémon.




~ An "Invisible" Stat ~

It might be a bit frustrating to discern them since IV’s are an “invisible” mechanic in the game, meaning they are never shown directly. In the fourth generation games, however, they hint at it by giving you a Characteristic in addition to Nature. While Natures boost one stat by 10% and lower another by 10% (or do nothing at all to the stats for a “neutral Nature”), a Characteristic indicates a Pokémon’s highest IV. Incidentally, IV's were introduced in the third generation games, having replaced the Deter Value (DV) used in the first and second generation games. Though the mechanics behind them differ, they ultimately serve the same role. For example, two Blaziken might have the same Nature, but their Characteristics probably differ. Maybe one has higher Special Attack and is “highly curious” (meaning it's got an exceptional IV boost in Special Attack as compared to its other stats) while the other “likes to run” (meaning its best IV lies in Speed). Knowing these traits help you guess your Pokémon’s IV’s.

These are the Characteristics, the stat they indicate is the Pokémon’s best IV, and the IV's they could possibly indicate.


>> Attack >>

Likes to thrash about - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Proud of its power - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Quick tempered - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Likes to fight - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
A little quick tempered - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27


>> Special Attack >>

Mischievous - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Highly curious - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Often lost in thought - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Very finicky - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
Thorougly cunning - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27


>> Speed >>

Alert to sounds - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Likes to run - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Quick to flee - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Somewhat of a clown - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
Impetuous and silly - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27


>> Defense >>

Capable of taking hits - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Sturdy body - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Good perserverance - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Good endurance - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
Highly persistant - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27


>> Special Defense >>

Somewhat vain - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Strong willed - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Somewhat stubborn - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Hates to lose - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
Strongly defiant - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27


>> Hit Points >>

Often dozes off - 1 / 6 / 11 / 16 / 21 / 26 / 31
Loves to eat - 0 / 5 / 10 / 15 / 20 / 25 / 30
Likes to relax - 4 / 9 / 14 / 19 / 24 / 29
Scatters things often - 3 / 8 / 13 / 18 / 23 / 28
Often scatters things - 2 / 7 / 12 / 17 / 22 / 27




~ IV Breeding - Gotta Tough It Out ~

When a baby Pokémon is born, all of its IV’s are already randomly set. Then, one IV from any stat of either parent is passed onto the offspring and overrides the corresponding old one. Next, another IV that is not HP is passed onto the offspring from either parent. Lastly, a third IV is passed on from either parent to the baby, but it cannot be HP or Defense. In this way, a baby inherits three IV’s from its parents, either all three from one parent, or two from one parent and the last one from the other parent. The other three IV’s remain randomly generated.

For example, let us use two Leafeon breeding for Eevee. The mother and father have the following IV’s for the respective stats in this order:

HP/Attack/Defense/Speed/Special Attack/Special Defense


Mother: 7/29/22/19/12/22
Father: 26/12/31/28/27/14

Now, the baby Eevee starts out with its own randomly generated IV’s for its stats. Some of these will be overwritten.

Eevee: 19/23/15/25/22/19

The first stat to be inherited can be any stat from either parent. Let us say that the baby inherits Attack the first time around from the mother. [29]

Eevee: 19/29/15/25/22/19

The next stat comes from either parent, but cannot be HP. Let us say that the baby inherits Speed from the father next. [28]

Eevee: 19/29/15/28/22/19

Lastly, the third stat to be inherited can come from either parent, but is neither HP nor Defense. Let us say that the baby inherits Sp. Defense from the mother. [22]

Eevee: 19/29/15/28/22/22

So now let us put it all together, showing the mother’s IV’s, the father’s IV’s, and the baby Eevee’s final Individual Values in this example:

Mother: 7/29/22/19/12/22
Father: 26/12/31/28/27/14
Eevee: 19/29/[color=green]15/[/color]28/22/22

In addition, you can have either of the parents hold a Power item. Each Power item corresponds to each of the six stats and are normally used to help EV train (more on that later), but gained another function in the Johto region remake games; they can manipulate IV inheritance. Each one, when given to a parent in the Daycare, will allow that parent to pass on the IV for that particular stat for sure. Take the Power Belt, which affects Defense EV’s. When it is held by a parent (either one), that parent’s Defense IV will be passed on to the offspring, such as that Defense IV of 31 from the father Leafeon stated before. If he holds a Power Anklet (and the mother is not holding another Power item), he will pass on his Speed IV guaranteed, meaning his will automatically overwrite the offspring’s Speed IV. As such, the baby Eevee would get these IV’s:

Father: 26/12/31/28/27/14
Eevee: 19/29/[color=blue]31/[/color]28/22/22


If we arrange the process in steps, it looks something like this:

Baby randomly generates IV’s > Power item overwrites one IV > Parental overwrite of several original IV’s

In the end, the Power item wins out since it is the first expressed, but sometimes the regular parental inheritance overlaps, making one of them erase the other (this is non-refundable). If both parents hold a Power item, one of them (equal chance for either parent) passes on the corresponding IV. Otherwise the offspring's IV will be its originally randomized one.





~ Checking Your Pokémon's Individual Values ~

It's really tricky to check your Pokémon's IV's with an IV calculator at lower levels since stats are so close together, but once a Pokémon passes 20, it becomes possible to get an accurate IV range as stats become more differentiated, and by 100, their full effect on a Pokémon's stats become apparent. However, a Pokémon's stats are influenced by Effort Values (EV's) so you need to take those into account as you calculate the IV's.

The Judge (in every Battle Frontier) can detect a general feel for the IV's of a Pokémon and gives you two indicators. The first statement is an analysis of the Pokémon's overall ability. Next, he will announce the stat int which the Pokémon has the highest IV (the stat that is indicated by a Pokémon's Characteristic) and indicate a general range of what the value could be. If a Pokémon has more than one stat with the same highest value, all of them will be stated (and one of them shall correspond to the Characteristic).

First Statement

The IV total is from 0 to 90: "This Pokémon's potential is decent all around."

The IV total is from 91 to 120: "This Pokémon's potential is above average overall."

The IV total is from 120 to 150: "This Pokémon has relatively superior potential overall."

The IV total is from 151 to 186: "This Pokémon has outstanding potential overall."


Second Statement

Best IV is from 0 to 15: "It's rather decent in that regard."

Best IV is from 16 to 25: "It's very good in that regard."

Best IV is from 26 to 30: "It's fantastic in that regard."

Best IV is 31: "It can't be better in that regard."


I show the Judge my Braviary and he says "This Pokémon's potential is above average overall." Then, he goes on to say that its best stat is Defense and that "It can't be better in that regard." This means that this Braviary has an IV total from 91 to 120 and that it's got a full 31 IV's in Defense. Although this is not the most accurate way to find out a Pokémon's IV's, it's a fast and easy way to check a Pokémon's general potential. But, for all the details, it might be better to use an online resource such as Psypoke's IV calculator.


ALERT!!!!!!

The Pokemon that you receive from in-game trades all have set IV's, and each one has at least one perfect IV! For example, that Modest Cottonee you get? It's got an IV of 31 in Sp. Attack! Use these Pokemon to breed perfect IV's onto your other Pokemon; only Rotom (genderless) and Petilil (female only) can't spread their IV onto different types of Pokemon, but that Magikarp you can buy after beating Ghetsis also comes with a set 31 IV in Speed.


This are some links to popular IV calculators from Psypokes and Metalkid. You click into the box and type letters of the Pokémon's name until it selects the right one for you or use the drop-down menu. Then, you input all the EV's that the Pokémon has gained so far (keep track). You get used to this format, and it's the easiest to use among the ones I've found. Actually, you can enter in the EV's you want to give a Pokémon, and it tells you the potential stat ranges (to see what the Pokémon is generally capable of). Use these valuable resources for all they are worth!*

http://www.psypokes.com/dex/iv.php

http://www.metalkid.info/Pokemon/Calculators/IV.aspx

*On a side note, the attack Hidden Power has its Type and Power based on a Pokémon's IV's! This is a link to Serebii for the details on how to find out about your Pokémon's Hidden Power and to Psypokes for a Hidden Power calculator.

Hidden Power Mechanics

Hidden Power Calculator


~ What do Individual Values do to Stats, and What are Effort Values? ~

First, let's establish that an IV influences a stat by about up to 31 points (by level 100) and can never bring a stat down; it's like every Pokémon gets a free boost, but some Pokémon get more of a boost at birth than others. For example, an Adamant Scizor might have 365 Attack at level 100 with a [very] poor IV in Attack, while another one (all else held the same) can reach 390 Attack if it’s got a much better Attack IV than the other.

For another, more comprehensive, example, let's look at two of the shiny event Raikou. Each is at the same level, no Effort Values yet assigned. Both are Rash Nature, as guaranteed by the event. But their stats......

Raikou #1

HP: 94
Attack: 61
Defense: 58
Sp. Attack: 90
Sp. Defense: 61
Speed: 75


Raikou #2

HP: 97
Attack: 59
Defense: 56
Sp. Attack: 82
Sp. Defense: 65
Speed: 76


These two Raikou, seemingly identical to each other, do not share the same stat values at all! This is because each was born with different IV's in each stat. For example, the first Raikou has 61 Sp. Defense and the second has 65 Sp. Defense, so the second one has a higher Sp. Defense IV. In fact, if you use the calculator earlier found in this guide, you would find out that the second one has a nearly perfect Sp. Defense IV, ranging from 27-29 (31 is as good as it gets). As stated before, the value of an IV ranges from 0-31, and that is also how much of a boost it gives the Pokémon by level 100. So, if a Pokémon has an IV of 25 in Sp. Defense, it gets 25 extra points in Sp. Defense by the time it reaches level 100.


EV's are similar to IV's in that they never harm a Pokémon's stats (unlike a Nature might), but that's the end of similarities. In fact, EV's influence a Pokémon's about twice as much as IV's affect them for any one stat, but since IV's affect every stat, they can affect a Pokemon more overall. Or not if it has terrible IV's; the effect of IV's range from 0-186 overall. EV's are more controllable, but only influence up to 127 points total.




~ What Effort Values do for Stats ~

Alright, what's so great about EV's? They can raise your stats. Each Pokémon can absorb up to 510 EV's, and each stat is only influenced by 252-255 of them (although 255 is the most that can be gained in any one stat, do not let those last few go to waste since the leftovers of two stats can affect a third). Any more than 255 in any one stat is simply ignored, and when the 510 total is reached, the Pokémon gains no more EV's in any of its stats.

Every four of a single type of Effort Value translates into one stat point for that particular stat. For example, if a Pokémon gains 12 Attack EV's, its Attack rises by 3 points in the end (by level 100). If it gains 100 Attack EV's, its Attack rises by 25, and so on. You may not see the change immediately, and the changes are usually registered by leveling up. At level 100, the overall effect of max (252-255) EV's reaches up to 63 points in a stat. At level 100, that's like the difference between a 237 or 300 in Attack! Being able to add up to an additional 127 points to your Pokémon's stats (up to 63 in a single stat) is significant, so no wonder so many people make a big fuss over EV training.

If you do a little math, you can see that I'm not pulling these numbers from nowhere. As you can see, 63 is the magic number because a stat is not increased until four EV's are gained in it. 255 is the max number of EV's a Pokémon incorporates into any single stat, and 255 divided by 4 is equal to 63.75 (but as stated before, the game rounds the stat boost down to only 63 points). Those last 3 EV's are wasted on the stat, and so that means it is better to only go up to 252; you can put those last little bits onto a different stat. Keep in mind that you do not need to push a Pokémon's stat to the max, and sometimes, it is better to distribute EV's among three or four stats rather than load all of them onto only two (and those last 6 leftover on another). It really depends on the Pokémon you are training. For example, Shuckle is so slow, it does no good to put EV's into it's Speed, and Kricketune primarily Attacks physically, so it needs EV's in Attack. Let us look into several basic examples of possible EV spreads working in conjunction with a Pokémon's strengths and weaknesses.

Dedicated Sweeper (Special)

Pokémon: Alakazam
[Base 135 Sp. Attack and 120 Speed is great for striking first and striking hard.]

Nature: Modest (+ Sp. Attack / - Attack) or Timid (+ Speed / - Attack)
[Choose Natures that do not disrupt a Pokémon's function; Alakazam will not miss any Attack since it will not be using physical attacks.]

EV Spread: 252 Sp. Attack / 252 Speed / 4 HP
[You can either augment a strength or cover a weakness, but here making Alakazam a more effective sweeper is the priority; do not forget those last few EV's since it could help you hang on by one HP someday.]

Moveset: Psychic / Focus Blast / Shadow Ball / Calm mind
[Note that all of these attacks rely on Sp. Attack, a stat the maximum effective number of EV's are poured into and not its Attack, a stat that it will not be using at all.]


Dedicated Sweeper (Physical)

Pokémon: Garchomp
[Base 130 Attack and 102 Speed is not as amazing as Alakazam, but is still quite impressive.]

Nature: Adamant (+ Attack / - Sp. Attack) or Jolly (+ Speed / - Sp. Attack)
[Garchomp is going for all physical attacks, so it should have a Nature that helps it out in this regard.]

EV Spread: 252 Attack / 252 Speed / 4 HP
[Many sweepers function only to attack swiftly and strongly, so they will focus primarily on Speed and an offensive stat.]

Moveset: Outrage / Earthquake / Stone Edge / Sandstorm
[Most of these attacks are physical attacks that reflect Garchomp's sweeping abilities, but Speed also let's a Pokémon pull off some tricks first, such as setting up a Sandstorm.]


Mixed Sweeper

Pokémon: Lucario
[Base 115 Sp. Attack and 110 Attack are pretty close, so Lucario can hit from both ends of the spectrum.]

Nature: Naughty (+ Attack / - Sp. Defense) or Mild (+ Sp. Attack / - Defense) or Hasty (+ Speed / - Defense) or Bashful (No effect), etc.
[Mixed sweepers are tricky to pick out Natures for, but lowering a defensive stat for an offensive one or Speed is usually favorable since the objective is to finish off a foe before being hit.]

EV Spread: (If Naughty) 100 Attack / 156 Sp. Attack / 252 Speed or (if Hasty) 200 Attack / 200 Sp. Attack / 108 Speed
[EV spreads vary with Nature and what attacks you teach the Pokémon, so strike a balance between the offenses accordingly.]

Moveset: Aura Sphere / Earthquake / Dragon Pulse / Extremespeed or Close Combat / Stone Edge / Poison Jab / Dark Pulse
[Balance out physical and special attacks, or lean towards one type if you want a somewhat specialized sweeper to pull a fast one on your opponent.]


General Staller

Pokémon: Umbreon
[A respectable 95 HP supplemented by a whopping 130 Sp. Defense and 110 Defense makes Umbreon ideal for defense.]

Nature: Impish (+ Defense / - Sp. Attack)
[There are several ways to go about it, but the best is to use a Nature to enhance one defense and EV's to bring up both of them but also let the other defense catch up.]

EV Spread: 252 HP / 156 Defense / 100 Sp. Defense
[Full points in HP is always a must since it protects a Pokémon from both types of attacks, and fill in the rest of the points shared between the defenses to cover all weaknesses.]

Moveset: Toxic / Confuse Ray / Curse / Payback
[Umbreon is meant to last a long time, so it can stall long enough for Toxic and Confuse Ray to take out a huge chunk of HP. Umbreon can use Curse to raise Attack and Defense, adding to both its offense and defense as well as lowering Speed (letting Umbreon get Payback's doubled power).]


Supporter and Status Attacker

Pokémon: Jumpluff
[Base 110 Speed is enough for Jumpluff since, as a support Pokémon, it's attacks count more than its stats.]

Nature: Bold (+ Defense / - Attack) or Jolly (+ Speed / - Sp. Attack)
[A little defensive ability is certainly welcome, but a boost in Speed could be even more crucial since its purpose is to lay down some traps to help out.]

EV Spread: 252 HP / 252 Speed / 4 Defense
[The idea is to cover HP for general bulk in both defenses and put in Speed to set up status attacks as soon as possible.]

Moveset: Sleep Powder / Stun Spore / Toxic / U-Turn

[The role of a support Pokémon is not generally to deal damage outright, but to inhibit the fighting ability of the opponent and let stronger allies do the heavy damage or to boost the power of allies.]





~ Assigning Effort Values ~

An EV is assigned simultaneously with Exp. gain. Each Pokémon you battle has its own EV value, and you gain them with Exp. at the end of a battle. For example, a Ratata gives one Speed EV after battle, and a Gyarados gives two Attack EV's. EV's are normally assigned based on how many more times a Pokémon can evolve. A Ghastly gives one Special Attack EV, but Haunter gives two and Gengar gives three. Sometimes, an evolved Pokémon gives EV's different from its previous form, such as a Starly giving Speed and Staraptor giving Attack. A Pokémon that does not evolve at all, such as Shuckle, may give more than one EV (or not, such as Smeargle which gives only one Speed EV).

Shuckle is also a good example of a Pokémon that gives mixed EV's. It gives you, upon defeat, one Defense EV and one Special Defense EV. Another one is Infernape, which gives one Special Attack EV, one Attack EV, and one Speed EV after battle. Legendaries tend to give three EV's, mixed or no, but why knock them out? Catch them; you can EV train on other, more abundant Pokémon.

Knowing your enemies helps your Pokémon grow the way you like them to. So, here are some suggestions (thanks to serebii.net for these) on which Pokémon to EV train on and where to find them. In addition, here is a direct link to serebii.net and its database on which Pokémon give what EV(s).


http://www.serebii.net/pokedex-bw/attack.shtml


>> Ruby / Sapphire / Emerald

HP - Whismur [1 point] - Cave on Route 106

Attack - Carvanha [1 point] - Route 119 (Super Rod)

Defense - Sandshrew [1 point] / Skarmory [2 points] - Route 113

Special Attack - Spinda [1 point] - Route 113

Special Defense - Tentacool [1 point] - almost any body of water

Speed - Zubat [1 point] / Golbat [2 points] - Cave of Origin


>> Diamond / Pearl / Platinum

HP - Shellos [1 point] / Bidoof [1 point] - Valley Windworks

Attack - Machoke [2 points] / Bibarel [2 points] - Route 211 (East)

Defense - Graveler [2 points] / Onix [1 point] - Iron Mountain (on Iron Island)

Special Attack - Ghastly [1 point] / Haunter [2 points] / Gengar [3 points] - Old Chateau * (see note)

Special Defense - Tentacool [1 point] / Tentacruel [2 points] - Route 220 or any other body of water

Speed - Staravia [2 points] / Pikachu [2 points] - Trophy Garden


>> Heart Gold / Soul Silver

HP - Hoothoot [1 point] - National Park (night) or Slowpoke [1 point] - Slowpoke Well

Attack - Goldeen [1 point] / Seaking [2 points] - Route 42, Route 9, Route 10, Route 24, Route 25, Mt. Mortar, Cerulean City

Defense - Tangela [1 point] - Route 21 or Metapod [2 points] / Kakuna [2 points] - Viridian Forest ** (see note)

Special Attack - Psyduck [1 point] / Golduck [2 points] - Route 35, Route 6, Ilex Forest, Cerulean Cave (Surf)

Special Defense - Tentacool [1 point] / Tentacruel [2 points] - New Bark Town (too many places to name, but New Bark Town is good for Tentacool)

Speed - Diglett [1 point] / Dugtrio [2 points] - Diglett's Cave


>> White / Black

HP - Ducklett [1 point] - Driftveil Draw Bridge or Stunfisk [2 points] / Palpitoad [2 points] - Moor of Icirrus

Attack - Patrat [1 point] / Lillipup [1 point] - Route 1

Defense - Sewaddle [1 point] / Venipede [1 point] - Pinwheel Forest

Special Attack - Litwick [1 point] / Elgyem [1 point] - Celestial Tower

Special Defense - Frillish [1 point] - Routes 4, Route 17, Route 18, Driftveil City, P2 Labratory

Speed - Basculin [2 points] - Routes 1,3,6,11, and14 or various other bodies of water such as in Dragonspiral Tower and Victory Road

*Haunter and Gengar appear only if there is a GBA Pokémon Game inserted in the GBA slot while you play Diamond and Pearl. What's more, you encounter only Ghastly and Gengar if you do so in Platinum, and Haunter can be found only in Turnback Cave.

**In Viridian Forest, Kakuna appear if you play Soul Silver and Metapod appears if you play Heart Gold. They give the same EV's after battle, though.




~ Ever Find Effort Value Training Boring? Speed It Up! ~

> Nutrient Drinks

Ever wonder about how Proteins and Calciums can raise your Pokémon’s stats? They do this by assigning exactly 10 of their respective EV’s to the Pokémon and changes the stat immediately (as stated before, training for EV’s require you to level up to see the change). However, each of these drinks only raises a Pokémon’s EV’s if they are less than 100 when you use them; they do not raise EV’s past that point. That is why your Pokémon will stop drinking them after around 10 times if you’ve not trained them at all, and even fewer if it’s started gaining EV’s already. In the end, EV training is unavoidable, but these drinks certainly speed things along.


> PokeRus

Ever heard of PokeRus? It doubles the intake of EV's in a battle, so a Pokémon's stats grow twice as quickly (though the caps still remain). If your Pokémon is infected, Nurse Joy will let you know after you let her examine your Pokémon. Also, a Pokémon will be marked with the word "PokeRus" near its picture when you look at its status. PokeRus can spread to other Pokémon in the same party as the infected one. After a time, the infected Pokémon will recover from it and ceases to infect other Pokémon, although it continues to gain the boosted EV's after battles. When a Pokémon recovers from PokeRus, a little smiley face should at the corner of the Pokémon's picture when you check its status. Storing a Pokémon in the PC halts whatever stage the PokeRus is at, so this is how you store and save PokeRus to infect more Pokémon later. Try infecting a bunch of Pokémon and storing them to infect the Pokémon you need to train.


> Effort Value Training Items - Macho Brace and Power Items

A Macho Brace turns the gain of one EV into two, two EV's into four, and so on. A Power item (Power Bracer, Power Lens, Power Belt, Power Anklet, Power Weight, and Power Band) simply adds four EV's to the total EV gain at the end of a battle.

For another example, a Gyarados or an Arcanine normally gives two Attack EV's. If YOUR Pokémon is infected with PokeRus, it doubles to four. If you hold a Macho Brace, it doubles again, making your Pokémon gain eight Attack EV's.

If you give it a Power Bracer, it adds four, so you gain two plus four, making the total six Attack EV's. If your Pokémon has the Power Bracer AND is infected, it doubles to twelve. Power Items do not need to be matched up, they add four of their corresponding EV's regardless of the Pokémon you battle. For example, you give a Power Anklet to your Pokémon and it gains two Attack EV's from the Gyarados and another four Speed EV's from the Anklet (still totaling six, but mixed this time). PokeRus doubles each EV gain as normal (four Attack and eight Speed in this case). Be careful when you use these items because they cut your Pokémon's Speed in half during the battling in exchange for faster growths.

Now, a quick rundown of these items for easy reference.

>> Macho Brace: Doubles EV's earned after battle

>> Power Weight: Grants +4 HP EV's after battle

>> Power Bracer: Grants +4 Attack EV's after battle

>> Power Belt: Grants +4 Defense EV's after battle

>> Power Anklet: Grants +4 Speed EV's after battle

>> Power Lens: Grants +4 Special Attack EV's after battle

>> Power Band: Grants +4 Special Defense EV's after battle


> Experience Share

The Exp. Share is an item that grants the holder 1/2 of the given battle experience points if held and even if it does not participate in battle. If the holder also fights, it hoards that 1/2 and the other 1/2 is redistributed among itself and the other battlers, but overall, no more experience points are gained; they are only spread around.

Now having covered the obvious, it is time to reveal that Pokémon using the Exp. Share also gain full EV's from the battle. For example, I send an Alakazam to battle a Gengar, and I have Budew with an Exp. Share in reserve. Upon victory, Alakazam gains all 3 Special Attack EV's and Budew also gains all 3 EV's; they are not split like the experience points.

But, if Alakazam is holding a Macho Brace and obtains 6 EV's, Budew still only gains the 3. It makes sense since Alakazam is the one putting more effort into the battle. This applies to all of the Power items, too. Only the holder is benefited by these items, and the Exp. Share grants only the base EV's granted in battle.

PokeRus can affect how many EV's are gained since the holder of the Exp. Share item can be infected and hold the item at the same time. But, if only the battler (and assuming the Exp. Share holder has not participated) has PokeRus, then the holder does not gain doubled EV's. So, if the battler has PokeRus and the Exp. Share holder does not, the holder does not gain extra EV's. If the Exp. Share holder has PokeRus, the it does gain the doubled EV's.

In other words, the increased EV gains only directly affect the Pokémon using the item or that has PokeRus; the Exp. Share does not let another Pokémon leech the beneficial effects of them.


> Rare Candy and Daycare

A Pokémon does not gain any EV's if it levels up by Rare Candy or in the Daycare. But dispel the myth that these training strategies are bad for your Pokémon and withdraw all the Rare Candies you've stored in your PC and feel free to deposit your battling Pokémon into the Daycare. As long as you fully EV train your Pokémon first, its stats will end up the same if you train it to level 100 by Rare Candies or in the Daycare or if you trained them by battling. Only make sure to assign all the EV's you need at some point before level 100 (unless you are playing by fifth generation mechanics).





~ Simulation Battles for Effort Values ~

Okay, do you think you've gotten all that down? Perhaps some examples are in order. Alakazam and Ghastly have agreed to demonstrate how items and PokeRus affect EV distribution after a battle.


Battle # 1 : Alakazam (no item) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one EV in Special Attack. Alakazam beats Ghastly without an item or PokeRus, so it gains one Special Attack EV.


Battle # 2 : Alakazam (Macho Brace) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one EV in Special Attack. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Macho Brace, doubling that one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains two Special Attack EV's.


Battle # 3 : Alakazam (Power Lens) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one EV in Special Attack. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Power Lens, and that that one Special Attack EV increases by four more Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains five Special Attack EV's.


Battle # 4 : Alakazam (Power Anklet) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Power Anklet, and that one Special Attack EV is accompanied by four Speed EV's.

Alakazam gains one Special Attack EV and four Speed EV's.


Battle # 5 : Alakazam (PokeRus) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it has PokeRus, doubling that one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains two Special Attack EV's.


Battle # 6 : Alakazam (Macho Brace and PokeRus) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly easily while it holds a Macho Brace, doubling that one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's. In addition, the PokeRus further doubles the total to four Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains four Special Attack EV's.


Battle # 7 : Alakazam (Power Lens and PokeRus) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Power Lens, increasing that one Special Attack EV by four Special Attack EV's. In addition, the PokeRus further doubles the total to ten Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains ten Special Attack EV's.


Battle # 8 : Alakazam (Power Anklet and PokeRus) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Power Anklet, and that one Special Attack EV is accompanied by four Speed EV's. In addition, the PokeRus further doubles the total to two Special Attack EV's and eight Speed EV's.

Alakazam gains two Special Attack EV's and eight Speed EV's, but notice that the total EV's gained is still ten.


Battle # 9 : Alakazam (no item) and Abra (Exp. Share) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly without an item or PokeRus, so it gains one Special Attack EV, and, in addition, Abra gains one Special Attack EV as well.


Battle # 10 : Alakazam (Macho Brace) and Abra (Exp. Share) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one EV in Special Attack. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Macho Brace, doubling that one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains two Special Attack EV's, and, in addition, Abra gains only one Special Attack EV.


Battle # 11 : Alakazam (Power Anklet) and Abra (Exp. Share) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it holds a Power Anklet, and that one Special Attack EV is accompanied by four Speed EV's.

Alakazam gains one Special Attack EV and four Speed EV's, and, in addition, Abra gains only one Special Attack EV.


Battle # 12 : Alakazam (PokeRus) and Abra (Exp. Share) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one Special Attack EV. Alakazam beats Ghastly while it has PokeRus, doubling that one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's.

Alakazam gains two Special Attack EV's, and, in addition, Abra gains only one Special Attack EV.


Battle # 13 : Alakazam (no item) and Abra (Exp. Share and PokeRus) VS Ghastly

Ghastly normally gives one EV in Special Attack. Alakazam beats Ghastly without an item or PokeRus, so it gains one Special Attack EV, and, in addition, Abra gains two Special Attack EV's because of its PokeRus doubling the initial one Special Attack EV into two Special Attack EV's.




~ Uh, I Already Trained My Pokémon Randomly. What now? ~

What about if you want to change your Pokémon’s EV’s? You cannot change Nature and IV’s, but you are able to influence your Pokémon’s EV distribution as you train them. The best thing to do is to plan it out and EV train a Pokémon as soon as possible so that they do not gain stray EV’s by random battling. Below is a description of what can be a lifesaver in case you need to work backwards on EV's.



~ Berries That Let You Backtrack Effort Values ~


If you have a Pokémon you dearly love like that Torterra you raised from a Turtwig that has stayed by your side through thick and thin (but unfortunately got EV trained on all the random Pokémon encounters up through the Elite Four), there are a slew of Berries that can help it start its training anew. Each of these Berries is a counterpart to a stat-raising drink, reducing EV’s by 10, but also raising a Pokémon’s happiness. In addition, if the Pokémon has over 100 EV's in a stat already, the corresponding Berry brings it down to precisely 100. That means that it takes 11 Berries at most to reset a Pokémon's EV's in one stat. For example, a Garchomp has the full 252 EV's in Special Attack (why would I do that?!) and I want to erase them. The first Hondew Berry I use brings it straight down to a mere 100 EV's, and each Hondew Berry after that reduces it by 10 (which means I need ten more Berries). These are really useful, so make sure to keep at least one of each Berry to grow more later.


~ Wait, If Effort Values Take Effect on Level Ups, Does That Mean I Can't EV Train My Level 100 Pokémon? ~

It is possible to make your Effort Values affect a level 100 Pokémon's stats if you give it at least four EV's in a stat and deposit it in the PC. Since this method is extremely tedious, it is probably better to EV train a Pokémon before it reaches 100. Unfortunately, this trick is pointless in generations 3 and 4 since, as mentioned before, EV's are distributed with Exp. in these games. Since level 100 Pokémon do not gain any Exp., they do not gain EV's, either. At that point, it is up to nutrient drinks to raise stats. Actually......



~ Fifth Generation Changes ~


In the fifth generation, there come new items called Wings. Each one of these acts like a mini nutrient drink, coming with a far less significant effect, but having no limit to their use besides the regular cap. The new Wing items also make a Pokémon happier after their use like the nutrient drinks and stat reducing berries. A Wing gives 1 of a sort of EV while a corresponding nutrient drink gives 10 of them (making wings 90% less effective than a nutrient drink before the Pokémon reaches 100 EV's). On the other hand, whereas nutrient drinks stop at 100 EV's in a stat, the wings stop at the usual cap of 255 in any one stat. That's right. If you've got an Action Replay, you no longer need to EV train; simply make a bunch of Wings appear in your inventory. But considering how tedious it is to give even 20 nutrient drinks to a Pokémon, it might actually be faster to go out and EV train with a Power item instead of ruining the buttons / touch pad on your DS by using 304 Wings on a Pokémon after the usual 20 nutrient drinks. It's easy to get the Wing items in the game, as they appear randomly among shadows on certain bridges. Simply ride around on your bike until you see such a shadow, step on it, and you'll either be swept into a battle (likely a Ducklett or Swanna) or you'll pick up a Wing item. Pretty Wings do not affect your Pokémon's stats, but the others give 1 EV towards their respective stats, as stated before.

Also, EV's are distributed simultaneously with, but independantly of Exp. In addition, stats are recalculated immediately after battle. This means it is possible to easily EV train level 100 Pokémon starting from Versions White and Black. If you plan to send your Pokémon over to the newer games, do not be afraid of training to level 100 anymore before assigning EV's; you're set!

Finally, please note that the term "Effort Value" is fan-made. They are officially called "Base Values" in Pokemon Black and White, but many shall continue to refer to them as Effort Values.






~ Bonus - On Nutrient Drinks and Wings and Berries ~


Protein and Power Wing raise base Attack and Kelpsy Berry lowers base Attack.

Calcium and Wisdom Wing raise base Special Attack and Hondew Berry lowers base Special Attack.

Carbos and Instant Wing raise base Speed and Tamato Berry lowers base Speed.

Iron and Resistance Wing raise base Defense and Qualot Berry lowers base Defense.

Zinc and Mind Wing raise base Special Defense and Grepa Berry lowers base Special Defense.

HP Up and Strength Wing raise base HP and Pomeg Berry lowers base HP.



~ Frequently Asked Questions ~

How do I know when my ev training is done?

Answer: The best way to know is to keep track of the EV's your Pokémon gained. It cannot gain more than 255 in any one stat, and 510 in total.

If you are unsure, there is always a person you can talk to who awards an Effort Ribbon to any Pokémon of yours that has acquired 510 Effort Values. For example, in the Hoenn region, it is a lady in the open air market in Slateport City the one in Sunnyshore City for Sinnoh. You can also talk to a girl just northeast of the Pokémon Center in Opelucid City in Black and White.


After I have 510 ev's is it safe to fight other Pokémon?

Answer: A Pokémon cannot gain more than 510 Effort Values. As long as it maintains this total, all other Effort Values acquired in battle are ignored. Yes, it is quite safe.


My Pokémon is level 100 can I still ev train it with ev reducing berries?

Answer: Er, please direct your attention to the three sections just above the Nutrient/Wing/Berry chart. That should be more than sufficient.


How come I no get 63 stats to my hp? I just killed 252 bidoofs!

Answer: The effects of Effort Values appear gradually; they are (somewhat) evenly distributed among a Pokémon's level ups from the current level to level 100.

So this means Arceus can finally be fully EV trained in B/W with the feathers?

Answer: Actually, if you simply battle, stats are recalculated with IV's immediately after battle. No need to use Wing items; just EV train like you normally would and it will show the changes in Black and White. Major improvement, yes?


Quick question. Is there a limit to how many feathers one can use? As in using vitamins such as protein; you can only use so many until it won't have any affect. Can the same be said about the feathers?

Answer: There since there is no special limit. Protein and other nutrient drinks stop when your Pokémon reaches 100 EV's in a stat, but Wing items can be used until no more EV's can be gained in a single stat (255) or the Pokémon has maxed out the EV total of 510.



~I hope you all find this guide helpful!~
Advertisement

jlin1314

Rank 2
jlin1314
Joined
11 Jul 2011
Posts
420
Location
United States
PostedOct 13, 2012 11:13 pm
One of the longest post I've seen in ages.

MeiuAngel

Rank 2
MeiuAngel
Joined
21 Sep 2008
Posts
564
Location
United Kingdom
PostedOct 14, 2012 1:38 am
o-o While I love pokemon, this is a strange place to post a giant explanation of EVs and IVs.
EDIT: So it got moved to the right place =P

Also, stat training drains all the fun out of pokemon, if you ask me. You should only use the pokemon you love, and treat them as your friends instead of a bunch of stats to be boosted <3

My team: Typhlosion, Amphoros, Lapras, Pidgeot, Bellossom and Raichu. Gogo Gen II! xD

sweetxdevil357

Rank 3
sweetxdevil357
Joined
27 Jan 2012
Posts
867
Location
Kuwait
PostedOct 14, 2012 5:20 am
You could have explained IVs and EVs in a few lines. Why the huge wall of text ?

Anyway, I used to EV train and IV breed (a bit) when competitive Pokemon was more fun. Now with all the overpowered Pokemon and abilities, it got boring.

noordin_ngentot

Rank 5
noordin_ngentot
Joined
11 Oct 2009
Posts
3676
Location
Moon Cell Uruguay
PostedOct 14, 2012 5:50 am
I'm no Pokemon expert, but if it's not complicated, it wouldn't take that wall of text to explain what IV/EV is, and how they work.

Avyn

Rank 5.2
Avyn
Joined
16 Feb 2009
Posts
12963
Location
Western Canada
PostedOct 14, 2012 6:13 am
You know, I was just thinking that these forums needed a gigantic post about IVs and EVs.

katashi65

Rank 3
katashi65
Joined
21 May 2011
Posts
1251
Location
United States
PostedOct 14, 2012 11:35 am
MeiuAngel wrote:
o-o While I love pokemon, this is a strange place to post a giant explanation of EVs and IVs.
EDIT: So it got moved to the right place =P

Also, stat training drains all the fun out of pokemon, if you ask me. You should only use the pokemon you love, and treat them as your friends instead of a bunch of stats to be boosted <3

My team: Typhlosion, Amphoros, Lapras, Pidgeot, Bellossom and Raichu. Gogo Gen II! xD  



Stat training doesn't take the fun out of Pokemon for me since it's just like practicing something you're good at. If you want to hit hard, work out a lot. If you want to run faster, practice running. It's like having your Pokemon exercise the right way to make sure they're in tip-top shape.

My team: Alakazam, Garchomp, Porygon Z, Umbreon, Braviary, [Pokemon being Exp. Share leeched]

katashi65

Rank 3
katashi65
Joined
21 May 2011
Posts
1251
Location
United States
PostedOct 14, 2012 11:36 am
sweetxdevil357 wrote:
You could have explained IVs and EVs in a few lines. Why the huge wall of text ?

Anyway, I used to EV train and IV breed (a bit) when competitive Pokemon was more fun. Now with all the overpowered Pokemon and abilities, it got boring.  



I could have done it in a few lines. I didn't. That would be boring for me.

smileybee

Elite Founder: Scarlet Blade
smileybee
Joined
30 May 2011
Posts
1160
Location
United States
PostedOct 14, 2012 1:45 pm
tl;dr. already know wat it is o3o

<marquee></marquee>
<center></center>

Kizuna7

Rank 5
Kizuna7
Joined
25 Dec 2007
Posts
3794
Location
Totally Not In Japan
PostedOct 15, 2012 12:31 pm


Yo katashi65, I’m really happy for you. Imma Let you finish, but aikosuke had one of the longest post of all time. OF ALL TIME.

~Lil_Kizuna

Display posts from previous:   Sort by: